202002.140

Seventh Circuit Follows Fifth Circuit in Holding FLSA Collective Action Opt-In Notices Should Not be Sent to Employees with Valid Arbitration Agreements

On January 24, 2020 in the case of Bigger v. Facebook, Inc., the Seventh Circuit held that a federal district trial court should not authorize notice of a Fair Labor and Standards Act (FLSA) collective action suit to employees of the defendant company who are ineligible to join the suit because they entered into agreements to resolve disputes exclusively via arbitration. The Seventh Circuit warned that without such limitations, FLSA collective actions run the risk of abuse for being too broad to opt-in and cause unfair harm to employers.

The appellate decision stems from FLSA collective action claims. Typically, early on in these types of litigation cases, plaintiffs will request that courts authorize written notice to potential plaintiffs of the opportunity to join in the collective action suit, in order to certify the collective class. These notices are generally sent to current or previous employees of a defendant employer, allowing them the opportunity to “opt-in” as another plaintiff in the suit.

In Bigger v. Facebook, Inc., a former Client Solutions Manager claimed that Facebook misclassified her as an overtime-exempt employee in violation of the FLSA. Plaintiff Bigger asked the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois to conditionally certify a collective action class and to authorize opt-in notice to a national collective of fellow Facebook Client Solutions Managers. In opposition to the request for notice, Facebook argued that most of the employees Bigger proposed to notify had previously entered into arbitration agreements. Facebook asserted these employees should not be classified as potential opt-in plaintiffs due to being limited to resolving disputes with Facebook through arbitration. Thus, Facebook asserted these employees should not receive any notice. The District Court held it was too early to make merits determinations at the conditional certification stage of an FLSA collective action and therefore authorized notice to the entire group plaintiff proposed, regardless of whether they had signed arbitration agreements or not.

Upon appeal, the Seventh Circuit held that the District Court should have allowed Facebook to prove that a large number of its employees had entered into arbitration agreements. The Seventh Circuit noted that the ruling is to protect employers from unfair or “dangerous” harm by stating, “notice giving, in certain circumstances, may become indistinguishable from the solicitation of claims . . . .” The Seventh Circuit thus concluded that district courts must give employers a chance to show that potential notice recipients have valid arbitration agreements.

The Seventh Circuit’s decision in Bigger followed the similar Fifth Circuit ruling last year of In re JPMorgan Chase and Company, 916 F.3d 494 (5th Cir. 2019). The rulings in these cases present a number of considerations for employers. On one hand, these rulings can make it harder for plaintiff’s counsel to use opt-in notices to identify potential plaintiffs for FLSA claims. While on the other hand, employers could run the risk of bearing the cost of arbitration for hundreds of potential FLSA claims upfront if such an issue were to arise, but be limited to arbitration.